Gardens

With a climate and topography that encourages year-round cultivation, the NC Triad is filled with parks and public gardens that are always in bloom. Visitors can find trees, vines, shrubs, and flowers that showcase the verdant beauty of the region at any time of year.

Native Nature in the NC Triad

Spread across 17 acres, the Greensboro Arboretum highlights plants that are well-adapted to the climate of the Piedmont. Featuring 14 specialized areas of cultivation, visitors can focus on the butterfly garden, the groundcover collection, the rose garden, the pollinator meadow, and a number of other exhibition areas that cycle into bloom throughout the year. Welcoming native and migrating birds, and flush with the smell of pollinating trees and flowers in the spring and dew-covered dropped leaves in the fall, the arboretum is an exciting place for plant, bird, and people watching in every season.

Public Art in Public Parks & Gardens

Tanglewood Park in Clemmons and Bermuda Run offers many enjoyable diversions, and for a delight for the senses, visit the Tanger Family Bicentennial Garden. Open dawn to dusk, this neatly planned garden combines beautiful bronze and stone statuary with beds that display everything from wildflowers to daylilies. Of special interest is the Fragrance Garden, whose scents of azalea and gardenia will send you into bliss when in bloom. So will the Sensory Garden with textures and smells that are elevated by the wind that whistles through and helps make clear that sound is a primary feature of any satisfying garden space.

The History of NC Triad Horticulture

The indigenous, Black, and Moravian cultures that combined to create what is now known as the NC Triad depended upon the land for their survival. Celebrate this history at the Old Salem Museums & Gardens in Winston-Salem, which continues the farming practices of the area’s early European settlers. Lots within Old Salem have been marked and dated, and the produce grown on each plot accords with crops that were planted and harvested on the same land more than two centuries ago. Visitors can learn more about the grains, herbs, fruits, and vegetables that sustained these people as they shaped the NC Triad into the region it is today. 

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